He Ain’t Heavy


I don’t know about you, but I know I can safely say there have been times when I was asked by others to help with something or to commit to time that I otherwise had planned for something else, that I hesitated while contemplating the weight of the decision. It was as if each decision was measured by some invisible scale that I had constructed over time to help determine whether I could afford it financially, emotionally, or physically.

Having been raised in a home which, at times, had very little money, I learned to make what I had go as far as I could.  Even so, for as long as I can remember I’ve been generous and shared what I had with others.  Regardless, at times there has been a little voice in my head that pulled back and hesitated from letting go of what I had; for whatever reason.

Our decision to help others is usually based on how well we know that person; whether they’re family or a close friend verses some stranger off the street who we’ve never met.  Due to the influence of social media, today we’re more guarded than ever with trusting others who ask for our help having seen so many people taken advantage of or stolen from.  One thing is for certain, though, if that person is someone we’re close to, say a family member or close friend, most of us would do almost anything to help them if they truly needed it.

Ironically, if we can break through our fears and hesitations to help, the sense of joy and wholeness we have afterward far outweighs the self-preservation we felt to start with.  It’s as though the burden we thought would ensue has lifted and we now feel better than before knowing we made a difference in someone else’s life; that we had a purpose. 

It’s when we see that person not as an object or someone taking from us, but as one closest to us whom we love (possibly more than ourselves) that we’re free to let go and give.  It’s love that takes away the burden of helping and turns it into an act of joy.  It’s love that takes the fear we feel of letting go of something we own and turns it into satisfaction knowing that someone else was helped by it even more than ourselves.

There’s a song from the 60’s by The Hollies called, ‘He Ain’t Heay He’s My Brother’ that really puts it all into context.  The song talks about helping to carry another’s burden along a long road with many winding turns.   Yet, their burden isn’t heavy because ‘He’s my brother’.  

That’s where I want to be.  I have a long way to go still, but on this road of life I’m bound to come across others nearly every day who will need my help.  If I can see them though love’s eyes as my brother, that load won’t be heavy.  Indeed, it will be light and we’ll both get there together…


The Peace You’re Looking For


Tonight, I don’t have a lot to say about things (well, I could type all night but will spare you).  However, there has been one word that has been resounding in my mind all day.  Peace. 

I don’t know why, but I feel like there may be someone reading this tonight who is in the midst of a storm and needs to find the peace that passes all human understanding.  Not the peach the world offers through pleasures, diversions, and denials.  You’re needing the peace that comes from within that no man can take from you.

If that’s you tonight, be encouraged that God is with you.  He hears your cries and knows your tears. He will look over you and shadow you from the heat of the day and bring light to the darkness.  He knows the plans He has for you and those plans are for your good.  He wants you to find peace and to be whole.

Rest in that assurance.  It’s the only place I know where true peace can be found.  Just open your arms and heart to Him and He will bring His grace to your situation; no matter what it is.  He will bring rest to your soul and calm to your storm.  Trust in Him with all your heart, and He will make your paths straight…

Love always,

Brad

Free from Hate


All too often today we hear the rhetoric about hate speech in the media and press.  We see acts of hate caught live on a cell phone video camera and broadcast to the world through social media.  It’s no longer a story we read about in the newspaper and forget; it’s in our living room, on our tablet, and on our phone wherever we go.  But, how do we deal with hate in our own life?

Growing up we had a golden rule grilled into us; never hate anyone.  We could be angry with them, dislike them, and even want to smack them, but when it came to hate, we were told there’s nothing worse.  I’ve kept that moto throughout my life. 

In even the worst of people, including myself, I’ve learned to look for what God may see in them (and me).  I’ll admit, it’s not always easy when you see what some people are capable of; especially when it causes pain to you or your family.

Hate, as defined by Webster is, ‘Intense hostility and aversion usually deriving from fear, anger, or sense of injury.  Extreme dislike or disgust, antipathy, loathing’.   Have you ever met someone who felt that way towards you?  I have.   Have you ever felt that way toward another?  I have. 

Albeit briefly, I have felt hate.  When I did, it was for a person who had brought great pain into my life unfairly.  They were abusive, manipulative, controlling, angry, selfish, vain, hateful, and basically sociopathic.  They felt no regret or concern for my pain or the pain they brought to my family.  All they wanted was for me, in their own words, to ‘Rot in Hell’ no matter what the cost. 

In all my life I’d never experienced such a thing and haven’t again to this day.  In the midst of it all, however, I found a way out of the pain, confusion, anger, and, yes, hate.  It was through the words of Jesus to love my enemies and to pray for them. 

In His own loving way, God reminded me that I was no perfect angel either.  He gently led me down the path of forgiving them daily (something I still do today).  Through the gradual act of letting go and forgiving them, I found peace in my heart and life.

God set me free from hating someone who stole memories from me and my family forever.  He has now brought me to a place where I can pray for them to be blessed and free from their own bondages to hate.   God has worked a full circle in my heart. 

Had I allowed that hate to fester it would have rotted me to the bones and brought great misery to my life (and the lives of those around me).  Instead, life sprang forth again and continues to grow.  That person is still hateful toward me, but I have given them to God and chose to pray for them.  Perhaps, one day, the love and forgiveness I send their way in prayer will find its way to them and return back to me…  God only knows, but I will keep at it because I choose to forgive and not hate.

Love always